Titans Foundation, Controlling Owner Amy Adams Strunk, Donate $1 Million to Tornado Relief Efforts

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NASHVILLE – The Titans are stepping up to help those impacted by the tornado that devastated areas in Nashville and Middle Tennessee earlier this week.

The Titans Foundation and controlling owner Amy Adams Strunk on Wednesday announced a donation of $1 million to The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee (CFMT) following the devastation of the EF-3 tornado that swept through Nashville and surrounding areas early Tuesday morning.

In addition, The NFL Foundation will make a $250,000 contribution to CFMT and work with local schools to assess needs for football field repair and equipment replacement.

"Everyone in this community and throughout Tennessee should be eternally grateful to the Tennessee Titans for their tremendous efforts in helping the victims of the tornadoes," said Ellen Lehman, President, CFMT. "This is an extraordinary gift toward our ability to respond and restore the damage caused by these disastrous storms."

CFMT will disperse the donation to non-profits throughout the region that benefit those in need of immediate and long-term aid. Among the non-profits anticipated to receive aid through the donation include Hands On Nashville, Westminster Home Connection, Family and Children's Service, the Community Resource Center, Crossroads Campus and many more.

"We are so encouraged about the amount of charity people have shown in the aftermath of Monday night's tragedy," Adams Strunk said. "As leaders in the community, we want to lend our help to this cause of healing and rebuilding. Together we will help our neighbors through this long and difficult process. We are hopeful that others will join us in supporting this effort any way they can."

The Titans have also partnered with Hands on Nashville to encourage volunteer efforts. Titans players, staff and their families will volunteer in Middle Tennessee on Friday, March 6. Other volunteer opportunities are available at www.hon.org.

"It truly takes a village to recover from a disaster and our sports community is taking that to heart," said Tara Tenorio, Hands on Nashville Chief Operating Officer. "Hands On Nashville is honored to partner with the Tennessee Titans as they lend their incredible team spirit to keep Nashville strong."

On Wednesday, rescuers continued to search through shattered Tennessee neighborhoods, more than 36 after tornadoes ripped across Nashville and areas to the East. At least 24 people were killed across the state, including two in Nashville.

The twisters that struck in the hours after midnight on Tuesday morning in Nashville before heading East destroyed more than 140 buildings, burying people in piles of rubble.

On Tuesday, the governor declared an emergency and sent the National Guard to help with search-and-rescue efforts.

President Donald Trump, who is scheduled to visit the disaster area on Friday, has pledged federal assistance.

In Nashville, the twister's path was mostly north and east of the heart of downtown, hitting areas in Bordeaux and North Nashville. Germantown and East Nashville took a direct hit, along with Donelson. Tennessee State University suffered major damage, along with Donelson Christian Academy.

The storm then devastated areas in Mount Juliet before eventually making its way to Putnam County, where the largest death tolls were recorded. On Wednesday, 33,000 remained without power in Nashville.

Those wishing to make a financial contribution to CFMT can donate to the fund by visiting www.cfmt.org and clicking "donate now" at the top of the page or by calling 888-540-5200.

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