Titans Defensive Coordinator Chuck Cecil Elected to College Football Hall of Fame

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ED DYASAuburn UniversityFullback, 1958-60A legend in the SEC on both sides of the ball, Ed Dyas led Auburn in rushing and scoring, was named the SEC's Most Outstanding Back and First-Team All- Conference in 1960.

Dyas played fullback, linebacker and handled all kicking duties during his four years at Auburn. As a freshman, Dyas started at fullback for Auburn's 1958 undefeated team. A First Team All-America selection in 1960 at fullback, Dyas set an NCAA record for field goals in a season with 13. Dyas was also selected an NFF National Scholar-Athlete. He was a Phi Kappa Phi All-America team member, a three-time Academic All Conference pick, received the Bill Streit Award for highest senior GPA and won the Cliff Hare Award, the highest honor an Auburn athlete can receive for academic, athletic and leadership achievement. Dyas received his Bachelor of Science in pre-med and earned his master's from Tulane.

Currently an orthopedic surgeon in Mobile, Ala., he has served on the committee, board and staff of the Mobile Infirmary Hospital for 19 years and the Providence Hospital Foundation Board for six years. He is head of physicians for the Senior Bowl and has served on the Senior Bowl Committee for 26 years.

Dyas is an Alabama Sports Hall of Fame and the Mobile Sports Hall of Fame.

MAJOR HARRISWest Virginia UniversityQuarterback, 1987-89A three-year starter at quarterback, Major Harris became the first player in NCAA history to rush for more than 2,000 and pass for more than 5,000 yards in a career.

As a freshman, Harris led the Mountaineers to the 1987 Sun Bowl. The following season, the quarterback led West Virginia to an undefeated season and a match-up versus Notre Dame for the national championship in the 1988 Fiesta Bowl. He accounted for 20 touchdowns that season while earning ECAC Player of the Year honors and finishing fifth in Heisman Trophy voting. During his junior campaign, Harris threw for 17 touchdowns and ran for six while setting school records for most total offense and quarterback rushing yards. He was voted a First Team All-America, named the ECAC Player of the Year and finished third in Heisman voting.

Drafted by the Los Angeles Raiders in the 1990, Harris spent several seasons playing in the Canadian Football League, Arena Football League and other semi-pro leagues.

In 1989 he was inducted into the West Virginia Sports Hall of Fame and currently resides in Pittsburgh, Pa.

GORDON HUDSONBrigham Young UniversityTight End, 1980-83
A two-time unanimous All-American (1982-83), Gordon Hudson holds the NCAA records for most passes caught per game by a tight end (5.4), most career yard per game by a tight end (75.3) and most yards in a game by a tight end (259 vs. Utah).

As a sophomore, Hudson started at tight end and received All-WAC Second Team Honors as well as honorable mention All-America. He tied the NCAA record for receptions by a tight end in a season with 67. His junior season, the tight end was the only unanimous All-WAC selection, also earning unanimous All-America status. As a senior, he teamed with Hall of Fame quarterback Steve Young to haul in an NCAA record 44 catches and six touchdowns in an injury-shortened season. And for the second straight year, Hudson earned All-WAC First Team and First-Team All-America honors.

Upon graduation he played two seasons in the USFL with the LA Express and one season in the NFL for the Seattle Seahawks.

Named to the WAC All-Decade team, Hudson is currently a real estate officer for Fairbanks Capital in Murray, Utah.

WILLIAM LEWISHarvard UniversityCenter, 1892-93
The first ever African-American to earn First Team All- America honors and a selection from the NFF's FBS Veterans Committee, William Lewis helped Harvard compile a daunting 22-2 record during his career with the Crimson.

Born in Virginia, Lewis started college when he was 15 at Virginia Normal and Collegiate Institute (now Virginia State University), the state's first college for African-Americans. He then transferred to Amherst College where he played three seasons before attending Harvard Law. Named Harvard's first African-American team captain, he became an All- American center even though he weighed only 175 pounds.

After his playing career, Lewis coached at Harvard for 12 years. During that time he proposed the "neutral zone" rule that is still used today to lessen the brutality of the game at the line of scrimmage before the snap. Elected to the legislature in 1901 and named assistant U.S. attorney general for Boston in 1903, U.S. President William Howard Taft later appointed him as an assistant U.S. attorney general. He passed away in 1949.

WOODROW LOWEUniversity of AlabamaLinebacker, 1972-75
The second player in Alabama history to be a three- time First Team All-American (1973, 1974-consensus, 1975), Woodrow Lowe led the Crimson Tide to the 1973 national title.

The 1973 Churchman's National Defensive Sophomore of the Year, Lowe set an Alabama single season record with 134 tackles. That season the Crimson Tide played in the Sugar Bowl, claiming the national championship. His junior year, Lowe earned consensus All-America honors and led the Crimson Tide to a third straight SEC title and a birth in the Orange Bowl. In his final season, the linebacker again earned First Team All America honors and served as team captain as the Crimson Tide wrapped up their fourth straight SEC title and a trip to the Sugar Bowl. Following his senior season, Lowe played in the 1976 Senior Bowl and entered the NFL Draft.

Taken in the fifth round by the San Diego Chargers in 1976, Lowe missed only one game in 11 seasons with the Chargers and tallied 21 interceptions. He returned four of those for touchdowns.

Following his career with the Chargers, Lowe served as an assistant with the Kansas City Chiefs, Oakland Raiders and the University of Alabama-Birmingham. He is currently an assistant coach at Jackson-Olin High School (Ala.).

Named to Alabama's First Team All-Decade Team and a Second Team All-Century selection, Lowe was inducted into the Alabama Sports Hall of Fame in 2001.

KEN MARGERUMStanford UniversityWide Receiver, 1977-80
A two-time consensus All-American (1979-80), Ken Margerum graduated Stanford, after a stellar career that established him as the Cardinal all-time leading receiver with 141 receptions for 2,430 yards and 30 touchdowns.

A three-time First Team All-Pac-10 selection, Margerum led Stanford to back-to-back postseason berths in the 1977 Sun and 1978 Bluebonnet bowls as well as top 20 national rankings in 1977 and '78. The 1980 Second Team Academic All-American shares the conference record for most touchdown receptions in a game (four) and holds three of the top five spots on the school's all-time single-season list for touchdown receptions. He also ranks fifth in receiving yards at Stanford (2,430) and sixth in yards per catch (17.2). He claimed the 1980 Pop Warner Memorial Trophy, given annually to the most valuable senior player on the West Coast.

Drafted by Chicago Bears in the 1981 he played in the pros for seven years with the Bears and the San Francisco 49ers, earning a Super Bowl ring with Chicago in 1985.

A Stanford Athletics Hall of Fame inductee, Margerum currently coaches the wide receivers at San Jose State University.

STEVE McMICHAELUniversity of TexasDefensive Tackle, 1976-79
Selected a unanimous first-team All-American, Steve McMichael led a Longhorn defense that allowed less than nine points per game in 1979.

A four-year letterman at Texas, McMichael was a member of the 1977 Southwest Conference Championship team. Twice selected All-Southwest Conference (1978-79), he graduated as the school's all-time leader in career tackles (369) and sacks (30). A finalist for the Lombardi and Outland Awards in 1979, McMichael claimed team and Hula Bowl MVP honors. During tenure at Texas, the Longhorns posted an impressive 34-12-1 record.

Drafted in the third round by the New England Patriots in the 1980 draft and picked up by the Chicago Bears as a free agent in 1981. He spent 13 seasons with the Bears, including six Central Division Championships and a victory in Super Bowl XX. McMichael retired as a five-time All-Pro selection and holds the Chicago Bears record for most consecutive games played (191).

Following his playing career, McMichael became a pro wrestler. He is currently the head coach of the Chicago Slaughter of the Continental Indoor Football League.

CHRIS SPIELMANOhio State UniversityLinebacker, 1984-87
The 1987 Lombardi Award winner, Chris Spielman earned back-to-back First Team All-America honors (unanimous in 1987 and consensus in 1986) en route to leading Ohio State to three consecutive bowl games and establishing himself as one of the all-time greats in a storied Buckeye program.

A three-time First Team All-Big Ten selection, Spielman was named the top defensive player in the 1987 Cotton Bowl. He was also a member of two Big Ten championship teams (1984, '86). He twice led the Buckeyes in tackles and graduated as the school's all- time leader in solo tackles (283). Spielman finished his prolific defensive career at OSU with 546 tackles, eight sacks and 11 interceptions.

After graduating in 1988, Spielman was drafted by Detroit in the second round of the NFL Draft, playing with the franchise for eight seasons and becoming the first Lion ever to register 1,000 career tackles. He spent two seasons with the Buffalo Bills and was named to the Pro Bowl six times.

Spielman currently works as an ESPN college football color commentator and with several local sports talk radio shows in Columbus, Ohio. He also is a visible participant for increasing resources for breast cancer research.

LARRY STATIONUniversity of IowaLinebacker, 1982-85
Equally impressive on the college gridiron and in the classroom, Larry Station twice earned First Team All- America (1984, '85) honors while leading the Hawkeyes to four consecutive bowl games and a Big Ten championship in 1985.

A four-year starter, Station remains the only player in Iowa history to lead the team in tackles for four years, finishing his career with 492 tackles. The team captain and team MVP in 1985, he was a finalist for the Lombardi and Butkus awards. A three-time First Team All-Big Ten selection, he led Iowa to a 35-13-1 record during his career. In the classroom, he twice earned First Team Academic All-America honors and First Team academic honors from the conference.

Drafted by the Pittsburgh Steelers in 1986, Station returned to Iowa to receive his B.A. in Business in 1987. He later returned to school again, earning his M.B.A. from Washington University in St. Louis in 1990.

Station is a member of Iowa's All-Time Team and was inducted into the Iowa Sports Hall of Fame in 2000. He was selected as the 38th greatest sports figure in the history of the state of Nebraska (by Sports Illustrated) in 1999. Station currently owns several businesses in Omaha, Neb.

PAT SWILLINGGeorgia TechDefensive End, 1982-85Rebuilding a program on the brink of collapse, Pat Swilling became a four-year letterman, leading the vaunted Georgia Tech "Black Watch" defense that allowed only 10.7 points per game during his final campaign in 1985.

Named to Georgia Tech's All-Time Team (1892- 1991), Swilling set the NCAA record for sacks in a game (seven against North Carolina State in 1985) while sitting the Georgia Tech mark for sacks in a season (15). Voted First-Team All-America by the Football Writers Association and First Team All-ACC in 1985, Swilling was named to Georgia Tech's All-Time Team (1892-1991) and inducted into the Georgia Sports Hall of Fame in 2004. He graduated as Georgia Tech's all-time leader in sacks (23) and tackles for loss (37), currently ranking fourth in both categories.

Selected in the third round of the 1985 NFL Draft by the New Orleans Saints, Swilling was named to five Pro Bowls. Named the 1989 NFL Defensive Player of the Year, he recorded 17 sacks that season, and his 107.5 career sacks place him in the Top 20 in NFL History. Traded to the Detroit Lions in 1993, he played two seasons for the Lions before finishing his career with the Oakland Raiders. Swilling was inducted into the New Orleans Saints Hall of Fame in 2000.

Following his football career, Swilling was elected to the Louisiana State House of Representatives in 2001 and served one two-year term. He is currently a real estate developer in New Orleans.

GINO TORRETTAUniversity of MiamiQuarterback, 1989-92A key factor in many of Miami's national championship- contending teams, Gino Torretta became one of the most decorated players in college football history, claiming unanimous First Team All-America honors, the Heisman Trophy, Davey O'Brien, Johnny Unitas Golden Arm, Maxwell and Walter Camp awards in 1992.

As a freshman on the 1989 National Championship team, Torretta posted a 3-1 record as a starter while filling in for injured quarterback Craig Erickson. As a junior, Torretta led the Hurricanes to the 1991 National Championship game and was named the Big East Player of the Year. During his senior season in 1992, Torretta once again led Miami to the National Championship game and a Big East Championship. Torretta again took home Big East Player of the Year as well as the 1992 Tanqueray World Amateur Athlete of the Year. He currently holds the conference record for lowest career percentage of interceptions (1.94), passing yards in a single-game (485) and longest passing play (99) yards, also an NCAA record. Torretta led Miami to a 26-2 record as a starter and was part of Miami's NCAA record 58-game home winning streak.

Torretta was drafted in the seventh round of the 1993 NFL Draft by the Minnesota Vikings. The quarterback played five seasons in the NFL and spent time with the Vikings, Detroit Lions, San Francisco 49ers, Seattle Seahawks and Indianapolis Colts.

Founder, President and CEO of Touchdown Radio Productions, Torretta currently resides in the Miami area. He is also the vice president for Institutional Sales with Gabelli Asset Management.

CURT WARNERPenn State UniversityRunning Back, 1979-82An All-America selection in 1981, Curt Warner finished his career at Penn State with 11 season, 14 bowl and 42 school records. Equally impressive, the Nittany Lions posted an 18-0 record when Warner rushed for 100 yards or more.

A four-year letterman at Penn State, Warner played in four bowl games, including two Fiesta Bowls (1980- 82) and a Sugar Bowl (1983). Named Most Outstanding Offensive Player in both Fiesta Bowls, he led the Nittany Lions to the 1982 National Championship with their Sugar Bowl triumph. That season, in spite of Penn State's record-setting pass offense, Warner contributed 1,041 yards and eight touchdowns. While at Penn State, he set records for career rushing yardage (3,398), career all-purpose yardage (4,982) and 100-yard rushing games (18). Warner is also second all-time in career kick-off return average (28.8 yards), tallying 922 yards and three touchdowns on 32 returns.

The third overall pick in the 1983 NFL Draft by the Seattle Seahawks, Warner spent seven seasons in the league. During his career in the NFL, Warner was a four-time All-Pro selection.

The owner of Curt Warner Chevrolet, Warner currently resides in Vancouver, Washington. He is also the founder and president of the Curt Warner Autism Foundation.

GRANT WISTROMUniversity of NebraskaDefensive End, 1994-97During Grant Wistrom's time in Nebraska, the Cornhuskers posted a 49-2 record and collected three National Championships behind the pivotal play of the two-time unanimous All-American selection (1996- 97).

As a freshman on the 1994 National Championship team, Wistrom notched 36 tackles and 4.5 sacks en route to being named the Big Eight Newcomer of the Year. During his sophomore season, he recorded 44 tackles, including a team leading 15 tackles for loss while be named First Team All-Big Eight as the Huskers won their second straight national title. In 1996, Wistrom helped the Husker defensive unit to a Top 10 national ranking in all four major defensive categories. As a senior, Wistrom won the Lombardi Award; earned a finalist spot for the Nagurski Defensive Player of the Year Award; and claimed an NFF National Scholar-Athlete Award. In 1997, he again stood in the forefront as the Cornhuskers notched another national title and he took home a second-straight Big 12 Defensive Player of the Year title.

Drafted in the first round of the 1998 NFL Draft by the St. Louis Rams, Wistrom earned the Ram's Defensive Rookie of the Year honors. Wistrom played in three Super Bowls during his six-season career, including a victory in Super Bowl XXXIV with the Rams. He retired as a player with the Seattle Seahawks after the 2006 season.

Following his NFL career, Wistrom started the Grant Wistrom Foundation, which funds efforts to help pediatric cancer patients. Wistrom currently resides in Kirkland, Washington, along with his wife Melissa and their son Wyatt.

Coach DICK MacPHERSONUniversity of Massachusetts, Syracuse UniversityHead Coach, 111-73-5Named NCAA National Coach of the Year in 1987, Coach Dick MacPherson led the Orange to an 11-0-1 record and the fourth spot in the final Associated Press ranking.

Named head coach at Massachusetts in 1971, MacPherson led the Minutemen to four Yankee Conference titles in seven years. During that span, he twice claimed New England Football Coach of the Year honors. His 45 victories at Massachusetts rank him third all-time in school history, and his 28-8-1 mark in Yankee Conference games notches a .778 winning percentage, which places him fifth in league history. The first UMass coach to win eight or more games in three different seasons, his nine-win campaign in 1972 tied the school record for single- season victories first set in 1901.

After his success with the Minutemen, Syracuse gave him their head job in 1981. MacPherson ranks third all- time at Syracuse for wins (66) and most seasons coached (10). During his tenure as head coach he led the Orange to five bowl games while posting a 3-1-1 record in post-season play. In 1987, the Orange posted an 11-0-1 record, playing Auburn to a 16-16 tie in the Sugar Bowl and finishing fourth in the national polls. He coached two College Football Hall of Fame players, Tim Greene and Don McPherson, eight All- Americans, two NFF National Scholar-Athletes during his 10 years at Syracuse.

MacPherson currently works as a color commentator for Syracuse Football radio broadcasts, splitting his time between Palm Bay, Fla., Princeton, Maine and Jamesville, N.Y.

Coach JOHN ROBINSONUniversity of Southern California, University of Nevada- Las VegasHead Coach, 132-77-4In 1978, Coach John Robinson led Southern California to a 12-1 record and the UPI National Championship after winning the Rose Bowl.

After becoming the Trojan head coach in 1976, Robinson led Southern California to five Pac-10 titles during two separate coaching stints (1976-82; 1993- 97). His Trojans made eight bowl appearances, posting a 7-1 record with three Rose Bowl victories. His overall bowl record of 8-1 ranks first all-time in bowl winning percentage (.888). He received National Coach of the Year honors in 1979 and was twice named Pac-10 Coach of the Year (1976, 1978). During his time at Southern California, he coached two Heisman Trophy winners (Charles White and Marcus Allen), a Lombardi Award winner Brad Budde and 18 First Team All-Americans.

Hired by UNLV in 1999, Robinson posted a 28-42 record in six seasons. His 28 wins rank him second in all-time wins by a Rebel coach. In 2000, he claimed WAC Coach of the Year honors after leading the Rebels to a Las Vegas Bowl victory.

Robinson currently works as a football analyst for the Sports USA Radio Network and resides in Carlsbad, Calif.

ABOUT THE NATIONAL FOOTBALL FOUNDATION & COLLEGE HALL OF FAMEFounded in 1947 with leadership from General Douglas MacArthur, legendary Army coach Earl "Red" Blaik and immortal journalist Grantland Rice, The National Football Foundation & College Hall of Fame, a non-profit educational organization, runs programs designed to use the power of amateur football in developing scholarship, citizenship and athletic achievement in young people. With 121 chapters and 12,000 members nationwide, NFF programs include the College Football Hall of Fame in South Bend, Ind., the NFF Hampshire Honor Society, Play It Smart, and scholarships of over $1 million for college and high school scholar-athletes. The NFF presents the MacArthur Trophy, the Draddy Trophy, presented by HealthSouth, and releases the Bowl Championship Series (BCS) Standings.

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